Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women & Girls (MMIWG)

Above is a picture of an altar created by interns at the AIRC's first-ever MMIWG Awareness Event, 2019

The UCSC American Indian Resource Center is dedicated to raising awareness about Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG), which is an epidemic plaguing Native communities all across the United States and abroad. In 2019, the Urban Indian Health Institute reported that 95% of MMIWG cases are never covered in national or international media. 

Our center hosts an annual event in honor of MMIWG on May 5, the United States' National Day of Remembrance for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. We also provide a general presentation about MMIWG for student organizations, departments, and programs on the UCSC campus and in the Santa Cruz community who are interested in learning more. Our presentation provides information on MMIWG history, issues of jurisdiction, legislation, advocacy, and provides audiences with resources on what they can do to help spread awareness on the topic.

If you are interested in hosting an MMIWG teach-in, please contact the AIRC Program Coordinator for more information. 

Program Coordinator: Jemzi Ortiz
Email: jortizfr@ucsc.edu

 

Below are some resources you may utilize to learn more about MMIWG:

ORGANIZATIONS

  • Urban Indian Health Institute
    • Tribal Epidemiology Center in Seattle, Washington.
    • Led by Director Abigail Echo-Hawk 
    • Conducts research and evaluation, collects and analyzes data, and provides disease surveillance to strengthen the health of American Indian and Alaska Native communities.
  • Sovereign Bodies Institute
    • Non-profit organization 
    • Led by Executive Director Annita Lucchesi 
    • Builds on Indigenous traditions of data gathering and knowledge transfer to create, disseminate, and put into action research on gender and sexual violence against Indigenous people.
  • National Indigenous Women's Resource Center
    • Non-profit organization
    • Dedicated to ending violence against Native women and children, lifts up collective voices of grassroots advocates, offering culturally grounded resources, technical assistance, training, and policy development to strengthen tribal sovereignty.

BOOKS

  • Forever Loved: Exposing the Hidden Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada by Dawn Memee Lavell-Harvard and Jennifer Brant 
  • Keetsahnak: Our Missing and Murdered Indigenous Sisters edited by Kim Anderson, Maria Campbel, and Christi Belcourt
  • Round House by Louise Erdrich
  • Sharing Our Stories of Survival: Native Women Surviving Violence edited by Sarah Deer, Bonnie Clairmont, Carrie A. Martell, and Maureen L. White Eagle 
  • Stolen Sisters: The Story of Two Missing Girls by Emmanuelle Walter 

FILMS

  • Wind River 
    • available for rent or purchase on Youtube, Amazon Prime, Vudu 

YOUTUBE VIDEOS

  • VOCES CRÍTICAS
  • An interview with Dr. Hernandez and former AIRC intern, Rennea Howell (Class of 2019) on MMIWG

 

  • RUNNING FOR MISSING AND MURDERED INDIGENOUS WOMEN
  • Runner and MMIWG advocate, Rosalie Fish of the Cowlitz Tribe, delivers a TED Talk about MMIW and explains how she uses her running platform to spread awareness

 

  • NATIONAL DAY OF AWARENESS FOR MISSING AND MURDERED INDIGENOUS WOMEN AND GIRLS: SEEKING JUSTICE FOR OUR SISTERS 2020
  • The AIRC Team, co-sponsored by the Lionel Cantú Queer Center and the UCSC CARE office, hosted our second annual observance of the National Day of Awareness for MMIWG. Below is the recording of our event which was held via Zoom. Please feel free the share this with friends, family, and colleagues. We appreciate those of you who were able to attend. 





NOTE: This list is constantly being updated with new information. It is in no way exhaustive. There are hundreds of resources online for those of you interested in delving deeper into the subject.